NBA Teams | Sports Marketing & PR Roundup

Gaming, Gambling and Engagement: Where Is It All Going?

This past Sunday, three of the most read stories in the New York Times involved the growing and ever-changing world of gaming and gambling. From competitive, professional e-gaming to lotteries now being devised to teach people about healthy savings to the continued troubles two of the biggest online games companies, Rovio and Zynga, are having, it is becoming more and more apparent that the digital and mobile gaming world is becoming more relevant, more fluid and in many ways more treacherous than ever before as brands and investors look to throw money good and bad into the space to see how to engage not just millennials, but a growing consumer base that wants to be more connected in the digital world than ever before.

Against that volatile and ever-changing mobile backdrop also came the final nail in the coffin for two of Atlantic City’s biggest resorts, the venerable Showboat and the quick to burn Revel, along with another massive employer going down the tubes in the coming weeks in the Trump Plaza. Put against that the massive marketing dollars being thrown about by arguably the two biggest players in the pay fantasy world, Draft Kings and Fan Duel, and the ongoing battle States are having to overturn federal law to bring relevance and dollars to sports gambling, and you have a virtual sports, gaming and gambling business that resembles the wild west, with huge investors trying to find answers as to how and where people want to engage in the gaming space, and what exactly they will, or won’t pay for.

Now the casino business is far from dead. Just looking at the companies lining up to open buildings in states like Massachusetts and New York and other states shows that sin is in, and those governments are more than willing to get their slice of the current pie. The problem is that the pie, at least as it exists today for boots on the ground casinos  is not growing. The goal for these new venues is to keep people home, and to find the right critical mass of players to keep the new casinos vibrant and healthy. That is the same challenge Atlantic City will now face; how many are too many for the clientele that make the trip down and across the Atlantic City Expressway, and what will keep bringing them back?

Some legislators feel that sports gambling, via mobile device or in person, will be the difference and could be a billion dollar federally regulated industry that will create new revenue streams for governments, for the casinos and for the leagues that would get a piece of each transaction. After all the sports gambling industry has flourished in Nevada for years, and is a growing multi-billion dollar business globally, with clubs like those in the Barclays Premier League aligned with legitimate legal betting houses for years. The theory is not if, but when, the legal gambling spigot gets turned on that the revenue, and the fan engagement, will rise all ships. Today that remains a theory though, as lobbyists on both sides battle back and forth to keep Nevada as the sole spot for sports gambling. Arguments of match and game fixing abound on one side; arguments of a tight federal system that works in many parts of the world fill the other side. When the stalemate will break is open for debate.

On the e-gaming side, insiders say the business is exploding, with million dollar tournament and some events drawing in excess of 10-12,000 fans, all millennials, watching tournaments both live and online, with brands lining up to engage and drop product in and around those games. Whether or not professional e-gaming is a massive sustainable business is up for debate though. Yes some players make huge sums and some brands have found healthy engagement and some tournaments draw big numbers. But what happens when those millennials turn to the next big thing and abandon the game they are so loyal to. Or what happens when they become a bit older and turn to more traditional discretionary spends; like sports or music or family or even school. Will they continue to turn out in massive numbers? The jury is still very much out. It is intriguing, but so are the X Games and the Dew Tour and the UFC and competitive surfing and Comic-con and any number of  platforms all battling for attention in a business environment that is becoming more targeted and much more competitive on a global scale with each passing week. Witness the issues Angry Birds has had in trying to stay engaged with an evolving and fickle audience, or the problems Zynga has had in keeping their massive scale with simple games.

Then there is the largest part of the population; those over 50. They are on fixed incomes in some cases and while they were the sweet spot of many casinos, they obviously don’t have the amount of discretionary income to keep all those brick and mortar casinos viable. They don’t really engage in e-gaming yet, but they do enjoy sports, so is there some type of hybrid that makes since in the digital world there that could cross over all platforms? They are avid lottery players, so the pay fantasy sports model could work for them, and the recent launch of effective savings programs tied to a lottery system seems to be hitting home not just with Baby Boomers but with a growing number of middle to lower income families who play traditional lottery in the hopes of hitting it big, but can now use an effective savings program that will help them get a chance at a bigger prize as well.

So where is all this e-gaming/gambling/traditional gaming business going? That is literally a billion dollar question. While right now all of these business seem to be working in legislative silos, the breakthrough success will come with more and more convergence down the line. Can e-game athletes mesh with traditional sports, and is there a pay system for consumers through a mobile, regulated environment that would bring revenue and excitement to consumers of all ages? Can federal regulators find a system where casinos now struggling as brick and mortar businesses battling for the same pie actually grow the pie and not just the pieces? Is some form of pay fantasy an answer in some way?

All has yet to play out, but thousands of brands are sitting on the sidelines waiting to see where all this nets out. For now, the collateral damage, especially in New Jersey, is pretty devastating in the form of lost jobs. Hopefully that is a temporary problem because one thing is for sure; the mobile digital gaming and gambling world is growing in interest on all fronts, and somehow, some way, the path to success needs to be carved.

A Hall Of An Opportunity In Springfield

If you are fan of inductions, then late July and August is your time. Two weeks ago the Baseball Hall of Fame had one of their biggest weekends ever with massive attendance and media exposure. Last weekend the Pro Football Hall of Fame served as the unofficial kickoff of the NFL season with their Hall of Fame weekend, and in just a few weeks the College Football Hall of Fame will open its doors in Atlanta for the first time. While all these Halls celebrate great largely American sports heroes, this weekend the one Hall in North America that is truly global will do its induction, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass.

The 2014 class is no less notable than those going in baseball or football the past few weeks; it  includes David Stern, and former players Alonzo Mourning,  Sarunas Marciulonis and Mitch Richmond, along with NCAA championship-winning coaches Nolan Richardson and Gary Williams and the pioneering women’s  team from Immaculata University. A great mix of stars from almost every corner of the U.S. and around the world. The Hall is located in Springfield, hard by one of the busiest corridors in the U.S. and not that far from Boston or New York. Yet for its location and its global designation, the Hoop Hall seems to get lost in the mix at this time of year; making it a great opportunity for brands and partners looking to maybe find a little diamond in the rough for promotion in a long, hot and busy summer.

Maybe it’s because the Hall is not tied to an actual time of year when hoops is top of mind; like baseball or football are. Maybe it’s because it is August and even those who are passionate about seeing such inductions may be suffering from a nostalgic hangover, for whatever the reason, it seems like there is missed opportunity abounding in Springfield. Basketball is the second-most popular game in the world; the All-Star cast going in is certainly worthy of large media coverage, and those returning to the Hall each years for its ceremony rival the returnees in any sport. The NBA and the national wires will do their part to get the stories told, but in terms of buzz and glitz and glamor basketball on the rarest of rare occasions misses the boat this weekend.

Can there be more that could be done? Sure. While none of the Halls are officially aligned with their respective pro leagues, their support is always welcomed and appreciated, so bringing more social media presence and technology to the induction in Springfield through the NBA and even FIBA partners would help. Maybe there should be more of an in-market presence for the inductees to take the Hall experience more on the road; Team USA just finished up its practice sessions with more to come, could Springfield have been a place where they came around the induction weekend? Does the ceremony have to be at a time of year when hoops is so far off in the distance? All of those questions have probably been addressed and answered by the powers that be, but the Basketball Hall of Fame weekend should be a must attend for media, brands interested in the game and fans, much like baseball and football induction weekends are.  The building is a grand tribute to a great game, as are its inductees. Finding the best way to shine a brighter light on the weekend is the challenge, one which companies should be looking at probably closer than they have in the past as a great entrée into basketball.

In The Social Space, The Heat Remain Hot…

Before any trade movement happened, the entirety of the NBA waited with baited breath on one event: the decision of LeBron James. Everyone in the sports world knew that once LeBron picked his destination, that the shakeout would be swift and violent. Now that the smoke has cleared, what did it all mean in terms of NBA Teams’ social media presence? Our colleagues at MVP Index took a look, and while the Cavs gained, the demise of the Heat seems greatly exaggerated thus far. Are the Heat in retreat?

In short: no. Miami still reigns supreme in the MVP Index’s rankings of NBA teams. They maintained their seat atop the social media mountain by staying the course and by having built such a solid global following that has stayed loyal, which is great, but probably not surprising news, for brands and partners in South Florida. Since LeBron vacated his throne in Miami, the Heat’s Facebook likes and Twitter followers have increased by over 413K and 28K respectively. If you’re wondering what those numbers look like compared to the rest of the league; the Heat gained the most Facebook likes in the entire NBA followed by Chicago, Cleveland, LA Lakers and San Antonio. Twitter, however, is an entirely different story. The Cleveland Cavaliers hold the title for the most Twitter followers gained since Decision II with over 75K. The next four teams in that category are the Lakers, Bulls, Heat and Knicks.

MVP INDEX TOP 10 NBA TEAMS

Miami Heat

Los Angeles Lakers

Boston Celtics

Chicago Bulls

San Antonio Spurs

Oklahoma City Thunder

Golden State Warriors

New York Knicks

Portland Trail Blazers

Los Angeles Clippers

 

TRENDING UP

Sacramento Kings + 5

Cleveland Cavaliers +4

Portland Trail Blazers +3

Memphis Grizzlies +3

Los Angeles Lakers +2

Chicago Bulls +2

Denver Nuggets +2

Minnesota Timberwolves +2

Golden State Warriors +1

Dallas Mavericks +1

Socially, Cleveland has made some serious strides. In addition to those over 75K new Twitter followers, the Cavs also gained over 240K Facebook likes. Additionally, they gained the most followers of any NBA team on Instagram at over 91K. They also more than doubled their monthly Facebook shares with an increase of over 13K. Overall, the Cavs moved up 4 spots on the MVP index to the 12th slot. In just over 3 weeks after the decision, that’s some significant movement. It will be interesting to watch the rest of the league to see how social strategies change and how fans react to see who will end up with the top spot as deals like the one for Kevin Love play out, and more importantly, how teams perform once training camp gets started in October.

One thing that is pretty clear though; social followings, unless there is something catastrophically negative occurring; remain tough to rock once built, and are still challenging to grow unless the social space is combined with real time results in games. That combination remains king; for LeBron and everyone else.

The Business of LeBron; From A Foundation Point of View

The latest in Tanner Simkins interviews is with Michelle Campbell, Executive Director of the LeBron James Family Foundation, which has thrived whether the NBA star has been in Miami or Cleveland…

Michele Campbell is Executive Director of The LeBron James Family Foundation.  The organization helps at-risk youths progress from third grade to successful high school graduation. With LeBron’s vision in tact, Campbell has infused long-term commitment into the operation of The Foundation’s programs to combat low graduation rates in Akron, Ohio.  Concurrently, Campbell serves a Chief Operating Officer for LRMR Management Company, also run by LeBron.  We sat down with Campbell for a discussion on The LeBron James Family Foundation, the positive impact she’s had in the community, and more. (A detailed biography of Michele Campbell is provided after the Q&A)

Full Court Press: For those who may be unfamiliar tell us a little about yourself and The LeBron James Family Foundation [LJFF].

Michele Campbell: I am Executive Director of the Foundation. My day-to-day role, well I get to exercise LeBron’s vision for him. He is pretty busy with his day job. [laughs] He has a vision and I get to put it into action.

FCP: Tell us about Wheels For Education? What about I Promise?

MC: Prior to Wheels for Education, LeBron held an event called the Bikathon in Akron. Here we had churches, schools, and other groups get together for a community bike ride.  We had carnival like activities; we gave away bikes and helmets, and more. But after the event, we never heard from the kids or families again.  We never heard how they were or what they were doing. LeBron then decided to no longer be involved with what we now call one-and-done, or these single types of events.  Instead, we wanted to do something that really made a difference, particularly a long-term difference.

There was a lot of research on what LeBron could do. We held meetings with the city and other groups.  But after one meeting with Akron Public School System, [where LeBron went], we learned that high school dropout rate was 24%. This was definitely not where we wanted it to be.  To LeBron education is very important so we decided to take this problem and turn it into a program. This program had to have a long-term commitment for the children, to help them graduate, to see them through graduation, and help them through the ups and downs [of adolescence]. Between 2nd and 3rd grades, children are identified by Akron Public Schools as potentially at risk, and then they are invited to our program.  The only requirement is for the students to attend a two-week camp prior to the school year. LeBron established this as well. They must attend 8 out of the 10 camp days.  Here we teach [intervention tactics, technological skills, and more] so they feel equal or closer to their peers that may have a little more opportunity.

Once they complete camp, they are with Wheels for Education program. [Unlike a one-and-done] We closely follow the students’ progress and have a family reunion every year.  Its cool for the students to be a Wheels For Education Kid in elementary school but not for the 7th and 8th graders. As interests change at this age, we move them into the I Promise network.  Our initiatives here are designed for these older students.

The first question you asked about me, I answered very short, but when you get me talking about the program, I can talk all day.  I really love the work we are doing.

FCP: What is your most positive memory with The LeBron James Family Foundation?

MC: I also serve as COO for the business side of the house [LRMR] I do a lot of budgets, insurance, and legal work. So I see both sides.  The work I do with The Foundation is very rewarding. The letters I get, the calls I receive; they are all wonderful memories.  We invite parents and children to our advisory board meetings.  In a recent meeting we had a mother tell us that prior to our program her daughter couldn’t read and she didn’t want to go to school.  The mother was crying and said that now the daughter gets straight O’s [grade for ‘outstanding]. The help that she got from the program– and there are a million other stories. That’s the best part of my work with The LeBron Family Foundation.

FCP: What is one challenge you had to overcome in your current role?  What have you learned from that?

MC: LeBron is popular and well-known world wide, naturally people hear about the program.  I am contacted all the time by people asking to bring the program to Seattle, Detroit, Chicago, etc. The program works because of the authenticity and connection LeBron and our Foundation shares with the community of Akron.  What I tell them is if you have someone in your community who is an influencer like LeBron is in Akron; then we can help tailor fit a program around that.  But, our exact model can’t be picked up and used in any city; we work very hard to be authentic to the community. We aren’t trying to spread this foundation to 20 different locations. I always try and explain that.

Also, it is challenging for a growing program to attract sponsors. Many potential sponsors aren’t interested in Akron, Ohio. It’s a challenge when we have the high goals that we do to only lean on LeBron and fundraising to fuel everything.  We simply need more funds to activate our goals [scholarships, etc]

What I learned is that if you stay genuine and authentic to LeBron, his vision, and what we have done; then people truly connect. LeBron has made a promise to these kids.  He wears his I Promise band everyday. People ask what its for, they make their own promise, and the mFCPion is spread from there. These are sold for 1$ and these funds do help dramatically.

FCP: Following the class until graduation, the open updates from LeBron to the kids, or any of the other unique approaches LJFF has taken — How did these ideas originate?

MC: LeBron’s ultimate goal was to promote education.  This was important. Especially after identifying very low graduation rates.  He wanted to fix that.  We have three different advisory boards of experts [education, youths, other]. We rely on them to say what specific efforts will help.  LeBron created the vision and the drive.  His personality is highly evident as well.

FCP: Is there a negative development or trend with youths that you find most alarming?  Do you have a potential solution?

MC: For us, it is key to understand individual circumstances.  One of the things I’ve honed in on is the perspective of a parent. For the single parent, with two jobs and three kids, it is a challenge to be at everything at once. Parents and caregivers like this take the brunt of it.  [With our events] I always think about time of day and small things like that with the parent in mind to help alleviate the struggle.

FCP: Shifting gears a bit, what is your favorite book?

MC: Little Women. When I was young I wouldn’t really read in my free time, and if I did I wouldn’t have chose this one.  Having said that, it was the first book that I can remember thoroughly. I enjoyed reading and talking about it with my mom. The special memories attached to this always stuck out.

Right now, I am reading The Story of Greater Akron. It is really thrilling if you’re not from Akron, Ohio. It helps me learn more about the city and its intricacies.  I look forward to using this to help influence our program.

FCP: Lastly, do you have advice or tips for young people? This could be in general or in the philanthropy space

MC: Make good decisions and get help.  It’s all about working hard without giving into outside pressures. In a nutshell, that’s my best advice.

 Michele Campbell  – Chief Operating Officer, LRMR Management Company and Executive Director, LeBron James Family Foundation

Michele Campbell has spent many years pursuing her passion in the education sector. The Akron native attained her education from Ohio institutions including a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Ashland University, a Master’s degree from Kent State University’s Higher Education Administration, and a Doctorate from the University of Akron as a Doctor of Education. Following her own educational achievements, Campbell went to work at the University of Akron to help others pursue theirs. Beginning in 1993, Campbell served on several posts at the University including Coordinator of Greek Affairs, Associate Director of the Student Union, Interim Director of the Student Union, and finishing her service as the Assistant Dean for Student Life.

In 2006, Campbell set her educational sights on a new vision as the Chief Operating Officer of LRMR Management Company and the Executive Director of the LeBron James Family Foundation. Through the Foundation, which aims to positive affect the lives of children and young adults through education and co-curricular educational initiatives, Campbell brings LeBron’s vision to create positive and lasting change in his hometown of Akron to life through real, executable initiatives. Under Campbell’s direction, in 2011 the LeBron James Family Foundation began working on the high school dropout crisis facing the Akron community and launched its “Wheels for Education” program in partnership with the Akron Public Schools. This groundbreaking initiative targets third graders and provides them with the programs, support and mentors they need for success in school, following them all the way through graduation. Now in year three of the program, Campbell’s guidance has helped grow this thoughtful, research-based, and powerful program to more than 700 students, and will continue to expand as it takes on a new class of third graders each year. Capitalizing on the positive influence of LeBron and executing with the help of Akron community and educational leaders, the Foundation has successfully engaged and encouraged students to create positive change in their lives. With Campbell at the helm, the Foundation has taken this initiative nationwide to reach others passionate about personal and social responsibility through the I PROMISE network.

Campbell’s work with the LeBron James Family Foundation has allowed her to take her passion for education and extend it to children and families who need it most. Under LeBron’s direction, Campbell has successfully transformed the Foundation from a charity to a lifelong commitment whose impacts will be felt for generations to come.

 

Want A Piece of The Cavs? Invest In the Bench…

With all the LeBron James news and the talk of skyrocketing ticket prices, ample TV appearances, out of control franchise valuations and all else round the Cavaliers, it will be interesting to see who the smart, calm head identify as key engagement opportunities around the LeBron return. Will brands try and tie up Kyrie Irving even more? How about Anderson Varejao, there flamboyant, international star soon to be a free agent?  Do you roll with the ever-improving Tristan Thompson, or a rookie like Andrew Wiggins, with lots of upside? They all will surely get their fair share.

However a guy who could be an even better bet for brand stability is someone who won’t even put on a uniform. New head coach David Blatt.  The skeptical may say Blatt is being thrown into a pressure cooker which could quickly spit him out, with wasted time and wasted money for brands.  Very, very doubtful. Blatt, for the right brands, would be the safest investment this side of LeBron. Why? Teams now are investing more and more in the long term culture of an organization more than the quick fix. Blatt comes to the Cavs before LeBron as a global commodity; a successful basketball lifer who has a reputation for getting the respect of his players around the world, and one who gives that respect back. He is multi-lingual, multi-national and has turned very turbulent situations around in places like Russia and Israel, all the while keeping strong ties and respect with the hierarchy of NBA coaching circles. While Erik Spoelstra was somewhat of an unknown quantity outside of coaching circles when he took over the Miami Heat and gained LeBron, Blatt is a known international commodity who could become a coaching star regardless of the performance of his returning superstar now.

So what type of brands invest in a coach new to the NBA? Some will depend on his level of comfort doing things outside of his given duties. The goal is to win with the Cavs and focus there, but that doesn’t mean opportunities can’t arise. The low hanging fruit are apparel companies who can dress Blatt as he becomes a TV fixture during games. There are international brands on the business side like law firms and even law and tax firms that now spend dollars against having a key spokesperson with little public effort; it would be much more behind the scenes entertaining and talking hoops. Educational businesses could benefit from a well-traveled American who speaks several languages, and that is just the start. Yes, the choices have to be wise and incremental, with a look to the future as the team evolves.

The future should include a carefully picked coach as well as his superstar players,  and if you are a brand looking to find a spot in the hubbub, grabbing its affordable rising star on the bench, might be a safer bet than grabbing one on the floor.

Cavs Win In Social With LeBron, But Heat Haven’t Lost…

We went to the folks at MVP Index to take a look at the LeBron effect is early on in social, and to debunk the myth that Heat fans evaporated…here ya go

What impact can one man have on a brand? Ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. LeBron James’ decision to pick his first team over the Miami Heat seems to have had an invigorating effect on a sleepy sports brand in social media.

 The Cavs, with a Twitter amplification rate of 0.86, could definitely use a boost. That boost was provided in earnest when  James took his talents and his 213.27 amplification rate to Cleveland. On the day Sports Illustrated dropped the story of James’ return home, Cleveland’s mentions went from 15  per hour on July 8 to a staggering 3,118 mentions per hour on the day of Decision II. An even larger change is seen in their retweet rate. On July 8, the Cavs were seeing a retweet rate of 14.54 retweets per hour, and on the day of the decision their hourly retweet rate reached 6,202.35 per hour.

The changes weren’t just on Twitter, either. The Cavaliers’ Facebook account also experienced some dramatic changes. 23,259 more people were “talking about” the Cavaliers on July 12 than they were on July 11. That is a 96% increase in people interacting with the Cavaliers’ Facebook account in one day. They also experienced positive changes in their comment rate (307%), Like Rate (77%), and Share Rate (75%) over the same time period.

What about their reach? Before his decision on July 11, the Cavaliers’ Twitter account 336,967 followers. As of July 12, the Cav’s have 370,421, a 9.92% increase in their followers. On Facebook, the Cavs had 1,700245 likes before the decision, and on July 12 they stand at 1,773,792 likes. The Cavaliers gained 73,547 likes in just over one day due to the decision.

How do fans react when their star leaves? We can’t speak for everyone, but it’s widely assumed that the Miami Heat fans are “bandwaggoners.” An account named NBA Legion stated that the Miami Heat had lost 300,000 followers in a tweet that earned 29,585 retweets. That’s a really interesting story, and were it true, we would have seen some real data that backed up the bandwaggoner claim. It’s just not true. The Heat actually have increased their following by a marginal 1,393 people, bringing their Twitter fan base to 2,671,454.

The Cavaliers can gain more than just NBA Titles with the reacquisition of LeBron James, they now have an opportunity to resurrect their brand in social media. The immediate impact LeBron James has on a brand is impressive, but what will really be interesting to watch is Cleveland’s ability to continue growing and engaging with their fans at a steady clip. With LeBron’s added reach and influence, they can capitalize on their revitalized fan base and win sponsorships, move merchandise, and increase ticket sales.

Djokovic Scores In China…

It was a good week to be Novak Djokovic. Historic Wimbledon run with great health, getting some rest before heading to the US to start the hardcourt season and the run up to the US Open. It’s also a good week to be a business partner. In addition to all the exposure  UNIQLO received for his patch on his pristine white uniform, his technology partnership with the PlaySight brand will get him a tracking system of his very own on his court in Monaco, and now he can tell everyone in China about it as well.

Djokovic whose popularity was immense in China because wins in the ATP  Shanghai Masters, and his fourth China Open in 2013 has been missing from the social media landscape because of the lack of access to Facebook and Twitter in the country. However this past week his partnership with social media agency the Mailman Group dropped him back on Weibo, ensures that his connection with his Chinese fans is maximized. Coming on the heels of Wimbledon the re-activation is key for some expanded ROI for his partners, and serves as a great entry point to the massive Chinese fan base.

It’s also a great win for tennis in China, which has grown in popularity with the success Li Na has enjoyed on the WTA Tour, and the increased marketing presence of both the ATP and the WTA across the country. Mailman’s proprietary technology, KAWO, gives brands digital access to China’s 618 million Internet users by repurposing and automating existing social media content onto Chinese channels. The effective use of the global social space by Djokovic, something not every elite athlete has, will be a boon to his growing brand popularity in key points in Asia as the hardcourt season kicks into gear, and tennis goes more front and center in the US. Novak has always been known for his timing on the court, and for his brand partners, re-engagement in China was perfect as well.

Best Practices: Amplifying The Message

The latest in Tanner Simkins q and a’s is with industry veteran Michael Neuman.

Michael Neuman is the Managing Partner of Scout Sports and Entertainment.  We recently caught up with the Amplify Sports and Entertainment for a discussion on career advice and developing trends.  Neuman’s brief bio is provided after the Q&A

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Full Court Press: For those who may be unfamiliar, tell us about yourself and your work?

Michael Neuman: I launched Scout Sports and Entertainment in 2010 as the in-house sports and entertainment consultancy at Horizon Media.  Horizon is the largest independently owned media agency in the world.  Our role is to provide strategic counsel to our clients who invest heavily in sports and entertainment content to develop deep, emotional bonds with their target audiences.  We sit at the intersection of sports media and sports marketing, a powerful and pivotal point where brand and consumers come together with frequent momentum

FCP: Why sports?

MN: The passion is unrivaled, people WANT to see and feel it live.  It’s the ultimate “must see” TV and live event programming.

FCP: Describe your leadership style?

MN:  Empowering, inclusive, incorporating, passionate, caring and invested

 FCP:What are some industry trends or developments that you are closely following?

MN: Brand curated content and the use of social media to flame the fires of good work.  AB’s Up for Whatever campaign around the Super Bowl was simply brilliant

 FCP: Who is someone you learned the most from? What did they teach you?

MN:  Doug Verb my first boss, hired me out of college.  Treat all people with upmost respect and understand what motivates them.  John Floegel when I worked on the McDonald’s business for teaching me the art of politics and Jonah Kaufman (McDonald’s owner operator) for teaching me the importance of metrics and speaking the language of your audience

 FCP: What is your biggest regret?

MN: I wouldn’t change my life at all, I’m doing exactly what I set out to do and have worked with some of the industry’s greatest people.

 FCP: If you go back, what would you tell you?

MN:  In athletics, the mental edge is the differentiator between good and great.  In business, start earlier.  Once you zero in a career, start building experience and a network base.  The industry is super competitive and amassing relevant experiences earlier will be the differentiator

 FCP: What was the last book you read?

MN: I’m reading “Leaders Eat Last” now

 FCP: Any tips for aspiring sports professionals who may be reading this?

MN:  If you truly want to work in the business of sports, you must be 130% committed to do whatever it takes to catch your first break.  The hardest part is getting the shot, it’s no different than the career minor leaguer getting called up in September.  Most fans don’t know this player probably spent the last 10 years in the minors.  There must be an irreversible commitment to succeed and on your own team, you need everyone on board including family, friends and your entire network.  Persistence and determination are omnipotent

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Neuman is the Managing Partner of Scout Sports and Entertainment, a Division of Horizon Media, Inc. Prior to joining Horizon, he was cofounder and president of Amplify Sports and Entertainment, LLC, a marketing consulting agency created to help brands harness the power of strategic sponsorship and maximize the impact of athlete and celebrity driven campaigns. Prior to launching Amplify, Neuman was Senior Vice President, Group Account Director with STRATEGIC (formerly Strategic Sports Group), where he provided strategic consulting services for sports and entertainment partnerships. Neuman previously held senior positions with Paragon Marketing Group (HALO Sports), Arnold Communications, and Global Television Sports, Inc.

Pony Up; SMU Joins The Beer Wagon

It is no secret that colleges of all sizes, especially those mid majors not in the top five power football conferences, have to continue to scramble for revenue to be self-sustaining. To do that, they have to continue to look for partners big and small who can effectively integrate into media opportunities and get the ROI that is needed to justify an effective spend with limited discretionary resources. For years one of those big spend platforms in professional sports has been alcohol, specifically beer, a category that for a long time has been minimalized by the NCAA and many of its member institutions unless the message was all about anti-drinking campaigns. Sales in campus at events? Relatively nonexistent since the national drinking age went to 21. College sports and beer didn’t mix.

However that appears to be changing, as schools carefully go through the minefield and test the waters to see f beer sales and college sports can safely exist. The latest school to make the leap into the suds business was Southern Methodist University, which announced this week it  will sell beer at football games this fall, following strong sales and no negative feedback from sales at their men’s hoops games at Moody Coliseum this past year. SMU now becomes  one of several dozen universities that have looked to alcohol sales to boost crowds and make money. Kansas State and West Virginia have been on board, while the University of Texas began a pilot program in February for beer and wine sales at sporting events.

There is solid money to be made by beer sales for colleges that need the marketing and the concession help.  The sales are controlled, carefully monitored and will probably be shut down at any hint of trouble.  Even in micro amounts, the dollars that can be brought in can boost revenue for schools that are running at a deficit or have tapped out of ROI on existing sponsors. Will beer sales lead to relaxed beer advertising as college sports becomes more and more of a big business and the landscape adjusts to less of a feel of a quaint event? Maybe, but the colleges and universities can augment their pouring beer partner with added awareness programs to share with the underage student body.  The ironic thing is that beer sales at certain events off campus or in suites at most arenas have rarely if ever been off limits. On campus where students are present there was a growing prohibition, but certainly not at events where elite boosters or faculty have been involved.

Some may wonder what will be next once beer is in the door. Will wine be ok? What about hard liquor, once off limits for professional sports but now more than OK with almost all professional events. Gaming? Colleges have started to seriously look at lottery revenue, and there are scores of games played in and around casinos every year, which is OK for the NCAA, so why not a bigger opportunity with the controlled environment of the lottery. The colleges need the money, and there is a long track record of success and savvy marketing, not excess.

This is not to say that out of control underage drinking is not a problem in some places. It is also not to say that selling some beer will be the quick fix for all financial woes the colleges are going through with athletics. SMU equated larger crowds to the fact that beer was sold at hoops games last year. In fact, if they sold Bud and Larry brown hadn’t produced a winner and an exciting season in the American Athletic Conference, how many extra people would have come out just because there was a place to get a drink? Not many.

For those schools with mega-crowds, the added sales can be pretty extraordinary even in a controlled environment. For adults attending any event, it provides an option that is mature and defensible. It is not bacchanalia, it is smart business. Let’s see how many follow suit and open the taps, for the beer and for the revenue.

Brand Hoopla: Five Star Basketball

As part of our ongoing series with Columbia University ad the Full Court Press blog; grad student Tanner Simkins spent some time with various marketers and newsmakers in and around sports business. With school ending and the camp season getting started, Tanner talked with Leigh Klein, steward of the legendary Five Star brand.

For over 20 years, Leigh Alan Klein has echoed in the world’s next wave of basketball talent. As CEO and Co-Owner of Five-Star Basketball, he has bridged elite young prospects and tier-one coaching. Five-Star has a long list of iconic player alumni including Moses Malone, Patrick Ewing, Michael Jordan, LeBron James, Kevin Durant, and more. The Five-Star pedigree claims even more basketball legends serving as coaches like Hubie Brown, Rick Pitino,  Bob Knight, John Calipari, and the list goes on. Recently, we sat down with Coach Klein for a discussion on general development news and his work with Five-Star. (A detailed biography for Leigh Klein is provided after the Q&A.)

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Full Court Press: Five-Star attracts the best basketball talent at its camps. How have you been able to remain the premiere camp in the country for so long?

Leigh Klein: The success of the camp continues to be rooted in the teaching of the game. We consider Five-Star the last bastion of teaching and it’s more important now than ever before with the sport evolving to a continual season (high school to club).

FCP: You are able to bring together basketball’s greatest coaches, scouts, mentors, and motivators to help with the camps – what’s the dynamic like working with so many great basketball minds?

LK: The link is the insatiable desire that each of these incredible people bring to contribute to the game in some way shape or form. They will not and do not quit without adding something that makes basketball better. They recognize that the Game is bigger than any individual and feel compelled to contribute to it and give back to the current and future generations.

FCP: How would you describe your leadership style?

LK: My objectives in leading are to provoke thought/build the IQ of the individual. The macro is the big picture and the micro are the choices along the way.

FCP: I imagine you have heard some great speeches over the years from visiting coaches – what stands out as the greatest/most moving speech?

LK: The most powerful story I ever heard at camp was from Coach George Raveling. It’s a true story about him as a young assistant coach and of a kid that he constantly crossed paths with along his way to work. The individual begged for his time and attention and George constantly shunned and pushed it off to the next day and then the next day. The kid one day decided to take his own life. Without question it moved me and stuck with me as a constant reminder that the only thing that really matters – is people. You can never be too busy to help a person.

FCP: What does it mean to you to have such a long list of alumni?

LK: We are so fortunate at Five-Star to play a role in the development of so many great players that we encountered as high school kids whether it was Michael Jordan, LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Chris Paul, Kyrie Irving and on and on, to see how these kids worked to reach their goals is incredible. For me, I’m just the caretaker of the legacy started by my father, Will Klein and his long-time partner, Howard Garfinkel as well as all the incredible contributors who left their impact on basketball and Five-Star Camp. Guys like Hubie Brown, Chuck Daly, Mike Fratello, Bob Knight, Rick Pitino, John Calipari and on and on, made the coaches and players they encountered better. Five-Star was the vehicle but the credit really show go to the incredible people who came through and made basketball better!

FCP: What’s your favorite book, coaching-related or otherwise?

LK: I just read Influencer: The Power to Change Anything by Kerry Patterson and it’s as good a book as I ever read. I believe it will help me be a better person, better father as well as give me great strategies to implement with our team at Five-Star.

FCP: Any tips for aspiring coaches/sports professionals who may be reading this?

LK: Versatility is the most important skill, for players and for aspiring sports professionals. Continue to add to your skill set. Look how the NBA has evolved, in the past five years,  we have seen the rise of video coordinators into coaching. We have seen the emergence of analytics both into coaching and in team management. Lastly, you see, those who were once sports agents now play prominent roles as team presidents and general managers. Versatility!

You have to grind. There are no shortcuts to success. If you can’t embrace the grind, then the industry is not for you. Lastly, learn how to sell. Selling is critical in every aspect. Selling yourself, selling your ideas….if you can sell, there will always be a job for you.

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For the past two decades, Leigh Klein, Five Star Basketball CEO and Co-Owner, has been responsible for the development of the world’s leading basketball instructional brand, Five-Star Basketball Camp. Coach Klein has directed Five-Star’s Instructional Video/DVD Series and has edited five books. He co-founded the Five-Star Foundation where he remains the Vice-President.