Warriors Tweedia Day Scores Again…

Now it’s not like teams haven’t figured out the need for use of social media or the power it now has in engaging fans. Still, harnessing that power into some centralized events is sometime a challenge. Then again you have the Golden State Warriors, who continue to refine the aggregated space and recently staged one of the best engagement platforms any team does; Tweedia Day.
Now in its fifth season, Tweedia Day follows the Warriors usual media day open house, the team when every player lines up to get done the wide variety of tasks from community relations, marketing and general media that can be housed and used throughout the year. Want to hear players doing promos in Chinese for the NBA? Media day is for you. It is very insular and usually pretty predictable, with now NBA TV dropping in for some live sessions for fans. But fan interaction? Nah, it’s all business.
For Tweedia Day, the Warriors give fans, through several platforms but especially though twitter, the ability to connect with players in real time. Factor in some live contests and some special added value areas for season subs, and Tweedia Day has become a must opt in for fans in the Bay Area and around the world. It is a nice aggregation of every member of the Warriors staff in a pretty simple but very effective format that most teams do as one-off’s but rarely as one full session. It takes time sure, but it leaves a lasting impression on all those who can join in. And of course, it is sponsorable.
Of course it’s not the only element of digital engagement that the Warriors do to build marketshare. From blogger media day to innovative video work, Silicon Valley’s team always seems to be fast and first in innovative engagement. Once again, a nice score for Golden State.

Selfie Olympics? I Saw An Ad…

It is always interesting to see what attacker brands will do to try and cut through the clutter. This past week there was a half-page ad in the New York Times from the Chinese cell phone company Meitu, in English and Chinese, in the form of an “Open letter” to IOC President Thomas Bach.

The letter asked President Bach to consider making “selfies” an Olympic sport, and mentioned the company’s just-completed “Selfie World Championship” and massive engagement of people using cell phones to take pictures as evidence of the recognition of “selfie-taking” as an Olympic sport.

Interesting attention getter for a brand not yet known in the US mainstream, especially in sport, but one willing to find a way to start cutting through the clutter in a simple way to get attention, or at least start to gain some attention in the massive space.

Now there is no doubt that “selfies,” even though some have said they have jumped the shark a bit, are still an ongoing phenomenon. The selfie’s around sport that surfaced in the World Cup, during The Boston Red Sox visit to the White House (where David Ortiz caused a stir with a selfie with President Obama), with the Stanley Cup and in thousands of other places are still being taken and shared around the world. Instagram has become the sharing service of choice for consumers, and sport has taken notice and continues to work in ways to engage fans through genuine fan generated images. This weekend there will be thousands of photos, many “selfies,” generated and shared through the MLB Playoffs, college football and the NFL, all showing various levels of fun fan, and sometimes brand, engagement.

So that brings us back to Meitu and their ad, the “Olympic” tongue-un-cheek outreach, and what it could mean. It was simple; no pictures, no hashtag, no website mention for fans to engage. The facts were clear, the message was there, albeit probably tongue in cheek. Why no call to action at all? Furthermore a search, at least an English language search, for the selfie world championship yielded…one blog post mention. That’s it. A 2013, Selfie World Championship did have posts but wasn’t tied to Meitu in any way.  All of which leaves the strategy for the upstart cellphone company as a bit of a mystery, but maybe that’s the goal.

Now because there is no English language engagement doesn’t mean that Meitu’s engagement in China or other parts of Asia to this point was not effective; there are massive social media sites in China that are not yet English-language or western friendly, so it could be that this was a first step, with not a lot to offer the American sports consumer yet. Maybe the ad was meant to be provocative as a start, with more to come; see what engagement or interest comes from American brands, or even sports organizations looking to engage with an attacker brand in the space, and go from there. Still without any call to action, how would one track or engage that easily? And what if you missed the ad? Almost none of the twitter chatter about the brand is in English, which leads to even more mystery as to the strategy.

Maybe in the end this was a one-off, some kind of outlier play by an ad agency looking to spend some money; large money for a New York Times ad, and leave it at that. That would be hard to believe. What will be interesting to see if there is a follow-up, a viral advancement in English-language sports and an escalation of marketing and spending for the brand with new partners in this country. Is this some kind of play for the Olympic space? Is it a way for an attacker brand to find a way in with athletes?

It certainly is curious; whether it worked, whether it gains traction, is all up in the air. Did you see the ad? Were you curious or confused? I was…or should I have said “meitu?”

Devils Go All In…

They lost their most marketable, albeit aging star; the cornerstone of their franchise to free agency. They are in an ultracompetitive marketplace which now includes the defending conference championships, a young rising team with new owners about to move into a building whose penchant is to tell stories very loudly, and to the south, a stalwart franchise that has owned a good part of the state for years and shows little signs of letting up. So if you are the New Jersey Devils what do you do? Everything you can, and that starts with finding every way to tie the community of both hockey fans and citizens of their state to the team, and find very way to tie the team to the community. Build the narrative, and there comes the loyalty.

Under their new ownership team and led by CEO Scott O’Neil, New Jersey made some of those strides last year. They went to great lengths to bring communities, whole towns and their leaders, to the Prudential center for themed nights which looked at everything from civic and academic involvement to athletic success, little of which had to do with hockey. Make the towns part of the fabric of the team, and loyalty will grow. This year, as training camp starts, the team is taking the other approach to compete the circle.

Their new campaign  “We’re All Devils Inside,” will showcase a season of Devils’ narratives on and off the ice that shine a light on the many faces that comprise the Devils family. Featuring players, season ticket holders, fans, Devils and Prudential Center employees, as well as those communities throughout New Jersey, the campaign reveals how the Devils inhabit everyday situations. The campaign will live throughout Devils and Prudential Center assets, including Devils in-game presentation, arena branding, web and mobile, and will be featured on game tickets and promotional materials, as well as television, print and out-of-home creative.

The campaign is smart as it links the personal stories of everyone around the club to a particular town or neighborhood, and makes that connection more hyper-local than ever before. All of this is in addition to the massive digital affinity programs the club has built throughout the years, and will hopefully strengthen the ties and the reach of the Devils brand as really the only professional team that now calls the State home and uses just “New Jersey” in its name. As the team builds new and marketable stars off the ice, making communities feel a part of that growth is key, and the clear communication that we are all in this together should give fans with some disposable income an opportunity to venture to Newark and enjoy their hometown team.

Of course winning helps, but the use of this inward and outward affinity to the Devils brand is a smart way to manage the controllable assets and keep the interest alive and growing regardless of the results on the ice.

Mind Sports Continue To Grow…

As the fall sports now get into full swing we see analytics, gaming and pay fantasy becoming more and more a factor in the decisions of American sport. Into that mix later this fall will be another combination of all of those efforts, the latest, most robust installment of the World Mind Sports Championships, which will be held in Beijing .  The bi-annual event grows in stature and acceptance every year, and now comes with a growing list of brands looking to activate in and around the space much like they do in traditional sports.

 Are all these events some sort of rise of “nerds” into competitive events to try and steal the thunder from the die-hard sports fans and jocks for media and social attention? No. What these events signify is actually a melding of entertainment and gaming worlds to hopefully form a partnership of healthy mind, healthy body which can appeal to millions and even attract some amazing brands to a more diverse audience.

Mind Sports have been around for thousands of years, and many, especially chess, have been used by world leaders to teach strategy for ages, that is certainly no secret. Most have always operated in a vacuum and away from the casual public eye. The advent of competitive poker on television, as well as an elite champion like a Bobby Fischer, have helped to gradually raise the image of some Mind Sports over time. However in more recent times, as science comes to understand more about the stimulation of the brain to combat issues such as ADHD and Alzheimer’s Disease, the value of all mind sports has grown. Factor in the ever-growing popularity of gaming, both casual and competitive, and the case for unifying the millions who play mind sports together for a country by country competition and celebration makes great sense, and has endless possibilities. The strength will be in the numbers.

Similar to the mind sports opportunity, robotics is growing in popularity amongst young people. A culture that has grown up with gaming tied to advances in technology gives robotics on a competitive level a wide audience that can connect across any boundary via the digital world, as well as in person to person traditional competitions. The competitions teach the same skills…teamwork, strategy, attention to detail…as traditional sports do and help to also stimulate the mind.

So what does this all mean to traditional sports?

First, the simple connection is to analytics and strategy. Coaches of any level, as well as elite athletes are constantly looking for a competitive edge, and the lessons taught by mind sports or even robotics, can satisfy another dimension for both strategy that applies to athletics and for an alternative way of thinking and expanding the ability to think quickly and effectively while competing. The world of traditional sports is also becoming more and more digitized, whether that is in scouting, analyzing skills, communicating or even watching events. Robotics and mind sports can also help provide a bridge of understanding into a high tech world by applying tools and technical elements to athletes and coaches. Then there is gaming. Perhaps the fastest growing segment of competition globally is competitive and casual gaming, whether you are considered a jock or a techie. Everyone enjoys games from Angry Birds to Madden ’14, and gaming provides another key common ground between mind sports and competitive traditional athletics. There is also the jobs marketplace. More and more we are seeing professional and collegiate athletics look outside traditional circles for leadership, and those with an understanding of the tech, strategic and business world are getting more and more opportunities. The competition in mind sports could help bring another employment dimension for those versed in both convention athletics and the expanded use of competitive mind sports and gaming.

There is also the projection of the complete individual, one that marries healthy mind and healthy body. First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative has inspired thousands to get up and get active physically, and balancing that physical aspect with a healthy and active strategic mind fits very well, so a mix of competitive athletics with mind sports is a great balance.

If you are a brand what does all of this mean? Lots. Those brands of all sizes involved in traditional sport are always looking to get more bang and get access to a larger, wider demo. Activities like mind sports and robotics provide that wider audience. Tech brands are always looking to access a more mainstream audience that is becoming more savvy, and traditional sports provide that mix. Does it mean we may see Nike or Under Armour sponsoring robotics or the U.S. chess team somewhere down the line? It is actually a possibility. Does it mean that you may see more athletes paying attention to bridge or more poker players throwing a baseball, or watching rugby? That’s already happening. For 2014 brands like Rado, Renault Nissan and Samsung are already on board to activate around the games and against the thousands who will follow online or watch in person.

Mind Sports continue to grow as an intriguing alternative to the traditional engagement,  one without many of the controversies and issues of traditional sport with lots of the gamification and strategies built in for a global audience of all ages. While it will always be a niche, it is a niche that is growing, as evidenced by media partners and brands in engaging in an organized fashion, which makes the property an intriguing one to watch this fall.

Gaming, Gambling and Engagement: Where Is It All Going?

This past Sunday, three of the most read stories in the New York Times involved the growing and ever-changing world of gaming and gambling. From competitive, professional e-gaming to lotteries now being devised to teach people about healthy savings to the continued troubles two of the biggest online games companies, Rovio and Zynga, are having, it is becoming more and more apparent that the digital and mobile gaming world is becoming more relevant, more fluid and in many ways more treacherous than ever before as brands and investors look to throw money good and bad into the space to see how to engage not just millennials, but a growing consumer base that wants to be more connected in the digital world than ever before.

Against that volatile and ever-changing mobile backdrop also came the final nail in the coffin for two of Atlantic City’s biggest resorts, the venerable Showboat and the quick to burn Revel, along with another massive employer going down the tubes in the coming weeks in the Trump Plaza. Put against that the massive marketing dollars being thrown about by arguably the two biggest players in the pay fantasy world, Draft Kings and Fan Duel, and the ongoing battle States are having to overturn federal law to bring relevance and dollars to sports gambling, and you have a virtual sports, gaming and gambling business that resembles the wild west, with huge investors trying to find answers as to how and where people want to engage in the gaming space, and what exactly they will, or won’t pay for.

Now the casino business is far from dead. Just looking at the companies lining up to open buildings in states like Massachusetts and New York and other states shows that sin is in, and those governments are more than willing to get their slice of the current pie. The problem is that the pie, at least as it exists today for boots on the ground casinos  is not growing. The goal for these new venues is to keep people home, and to find the right critical mass of players to keep the new casinos vibrant and healthy. That is the same challenge Atlantic City will now face; how many are too many for the clientele that make the trip down and across the Atlantic City Expressway, and what will keep bringing them back?

Some legislators feel that sports gambling, via mobile device or in person, will be the difference and could be a billion dollar federally regulated industry that will create new revenue streams for governments, for the casinos and for the leagues that would get a piece of each transaction. After all the sports gambling industry has flourished in Nevada for years, and is a growing multi-billion dollar business globally, with clubs like those in the Barclays Premier League aligned with legitimate legal betting houses for years. The theory is not if, but when, the legal gambling spigot gets turned on that the revenue, and the fan engagement, will rise all ships. Today that remains a theory though, as lobbyists on both sides battle back and forth to keep Nevada as the sole spot for sports gambling. Arguments of match and game fixing abound on one side; arguments of a tight federal system that works in many parts of the world fill the other side. When the stalemate will break is open for debate.

On the e-gaming side, insiders say the business is exploding, with million dollar tournament and some events drawing in excess of 10-12,000 fans, all millennials, watching tournaments both live and online, with brands lining up to engage and drop product in and around those games. Whether or not professional e-gaming is a massive sustainable business is up for debate though. Yes some players make huge sums and some brands have found healthy engagement and some tournaments draw big numbers. But what happens when those millennials turn to the next big thing and abandon the game they are so loyal to. Or what happens when they become a bit older and turn to more traditional discretionary spends; like sports or music or family or even school. Will they continue to turn out in massive numbers? The jury is still very much out. It is intriguing, but so are the X Games and the Dew Tour and the UFC and competitive surfing and Comic-con and any number of  platforms all battling for attention in a business environment that is becoming more targeted and much more competitive on a global scale with each passing week. Witness the issues Angry Birds has had in trying to stay engaged with an evolving and fickle audience, or the problems Zynga has had in keeping their massive scale with simple games.

Then there is the largest part of the population; those over 50. They are on fixed incomes in some cases and while they were the sweet spot of many casinos, they obviously don’t have the amount of discretionary income to keep all those brick and mortar casinos viable. They don’t really engage in e-gaming yet, but they do enjoy sports, so is there some type of hybrid that makes since in the digital world there that could cross over all platforms? They are avid lottery players, so the pay fantasy sports model could work for them, and the recent launch of effective savings programs tied to a lottery system seems to be hitting home not just with Baby Boomers but with a growing number of middle to lower income families who play traditional lottery in the hopes of hitting it big, but can now use an effective savings program that will help them get a chance at a bigger prize as well.

So where is all this e-gaming/gambling/traditional gaming business going? That is literally a billion dollar question. While right now all of these business seem to be working in legislative silos, the breakthrough success will come with more and more convergence down the line. Can e-game athletes mesh with traditional sports, and is there a pay system for consumers through a mobile, regulated environment that would bring revenue and excitement to consumers of all ages? Can federal regulators find a system where casinos now struggling as brick and mortar businesses battling for the same pie actually grow the pie and not just the pieces? Is some form of pay fantasy an answer in some way?

All has yet to play out, but thousands of brands are sitting on the sidelines waiting to see where all this nets out. For now, the collateral damage, especially in New Jersey, is pretty devastating in the form of lost jobs. Hopefully that is a temporary problem because one thing is for sure; the mobile digital gaming and gambling world is growing in interest on all fronts, and somehow, some way, the path to success needs to be carved.

A Hall Of An Opportunity In Springfield

If you are fan of inductions, then late July and August is your time. Two weeks ago the Baseball Hall of Fame had one of their biggest weekends ever with massive attendance and media exposure. Last weekend the Pro Football Hall of Fame served as the unofficial kickoff of the NFL season with their Hall of Fame weekend, and in just a few weeks the College Football Hall of Fame will open its doors in Atlanta for the first time. While all these Halls celebrate great largely American sports heroes, this weekend the one Hall in North America that is truly global will do its induction, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass.

The 2014 class is no less notable than those going in baseball or football the past few weeks; it  includes David Stern, and former players Alonzo Mourning,  Sarunas Marciulonis and Mitch Richmond, along with NCAA championship-winning coaches Nolan Richardson and Gary Williams and the pioneering women’s  team from Immaculata University. A great mix of stars from almost every corner of the U.S. and around the world. The Hall is located in Springfield, hard by one of the busiest corridors in the U.S. and not that far from Boston or New York. Yet for its location and its global designation, the Hoop Hall seems to get lost in the mix at this time of year; making it a great opportunity for brands and partners looking to maybe find a little diamond in the rough for promotion in a long, hot and busy summer.

Maybe it’s because the Hall is not tied to an actual time of year when hoops is top of mind; like baseball or football are. Maybe it’s because it is August and even those who are passionate about seeing such inductions may be suffering from a nostalgic hangover, for whatever the reason, it seems like there is missed opportunity abounding in Springfield. Basketball is the second-most popular game in the world; the All-Star cast going in is certainly worthy of large media coverage, and those returning to the Hall each years for its ceremony rival the returnees in any sport. The NBA and the national wires will do their part to get the stories told, but in terms of buzz and glitz and glamor basketball on the rarest of rare occasions misses the boat this weekend.

Can there be more that could be done? Sure. While none of the Halls are officially aligned with their respective pro leagues, their support is always welcomed and appreciated, so bringing more social media presence and technology to the induction in Springfield through the NBA and even FIBA partners would help. Maybe there should be more of an in-market presence for the inductees to take the Hall experience more on the road; Team USA just finished up its practice sessions with more to come, could Springfield have been a place where they came around the induction weekend? Does the ceremony have to be at a time of year when hoops is so far off in the distance? All of those questions have probably been addressed and answered by the powers that be, but the Basketball Hall of Fame weekend should be a must attend for media, brands interested in the game and fans, much like baseball and football induction weekends are.  The building is a grand tribute to a great game, as are its inductees. Finding the best way to shine a brighter light on the weekend is the challenge, one which companies should be looking at probably closer than they have in the past as a great entrée into basketball.

In The Social Space, The Heat Remain Hot…

Before any trade movement happened, the entirety of the NBA waited with baited breath on one event: the decision of LeBron James. Everyone in the sports world knew that once LeBron picked his destination, that the shakeout would be swift and violent. Now that the smoke has cleared, what did it all mean in terms of NBA Teams’ social media presence? Our colleagues at MVP Index took a look, and while the Cavs gained, the demise of the Heat seems greatly exaggerated thus far. Are the Heat in retreat?

In short: no. Miami still reigns supreme in the MVP Index’s rankings of NBA teams. They maintained their seat atop the social media mountain by staying the course and by having built such a solid global following that has stayed loyal, which is great, but probably not surprising news, for brands and partners in South Florida. Since LeBron vacated his throne in Miami, the Heat’s Facebook likes and Twitter followers have increased by over 413K and 28K respectively. If you’re wondering what those numbers look like compared to the rest of the league; the Heat gained the most Facebook likes in the entire NBA followed by Chicago, Cleveland, LA Lakers and San Antonio. Twitter, however, is an entirely different story. The Cleveland Cavaliers hold the title for the most Twitter followers gained since Decision II with over 75K. The next four teams in that category are the Lakers, Bulls, Heat and Knicks.

MVP INDEX TOP 10 NBA TEAMS

Miami Heat

Los Angeles Lakers

Boston Celtics

Chicago Bulls

San Antonio Spurs

Oklahoma City Thunder

Golden State Warriors

New York Knicks

Portland Trail Blazers

Los Angeles Clippers

 

TRENDING UP

Sacramento Kings + 5

Cleveland Cavaliers +4

Portland Trail Blazers +3

Memphis Grizzlies +3

Los Angeles Lakers +2

Chicago Bulls +2

Denver Nuggets +2

Minnesota Timberwolves +2

Golden State Warriors +1

Dallas Mavericks +1

Socially, Cleveland has made some serious strides. In addition to those over 75K new Twitter followers, the Cavs also gained over 240K Facebook likes. Additionally, they gained the most followers of any NBA team on Instagram at over 91K. They also more than doubled their monthly Facebook shares with an increase of over 13K. Overall, the Cavs moved up 4 spots on the MVP index to the 12th slot. In just over 3 weeks after the decision, that’s some significant movement. It will be interesting to watch the rest of the league to see how social strategies change and how fans react to see who will end up with the top spot as deals like the one for Kevin Love play out, and more importantly, how teams perform once training camp gets started in October.

One thing that is pretty clear though; social followings, unless there is something catastrophically negative occurring; remain tough to rock once built, and are still challenging to grow unless the social space is combined with real time results in games. That combination remains king; for LeBron and everyone else.

The Business of LeBron; From A Foundation Point of View

The latest in Tanner Simkins interviews is with Michelle Campbell, Executive Director of the LeBron James Family Foundation, which has thrived whether the NBA star has been in Miami or Cleveland…

Michele Campbell is Executive Director of The LeBron James Family Foundation.  The organization helps at-risk youths progress from third grade to successful high school graduation. With LeBron’s vision in tact, Campbell has infused long-term commitment into the operation of The Foundation’s programs to combat low graduation rates in Akron, Ohio.  Concurrently, Campbell serves a Chief Operating Officer for LRMR Management Company, also run by LeBron.  We sat down with Campbell for a discussion on The LeBron James Family Foundation, the positive impact she’s had in the community, and more. (A detailed biography of Michele Campbell is provided after the Q&A)

Full Court Press: For those who may be unfamiliar tell us a little about yourself and The LeBron James Family Foundation [LJFF].

Michele Campbell: I am Executive Director of the Foundation. My day-to-day role, well I get to exercise LeBron’s vision for him. He is pretty busy with his day job. [laughs] He has a vision and I get to put it into action.

FCP: Tell us about Wheels For Education? What about I Promise?

MC: Prior to Wheels for Education, LeBron held an event called the Bikathon in Akron. Here we had churches, schools, and other groups get together for a community bike ride.  We had carnival like activities; we gave away bikes and helmets, and more. But after the event, we never heard from the kids or families again.  We never heard how they were or what they were doing. LeBron then decided to no longer be involved with what we now call one-and-done, or these single types of events.  Instead, we wanted to do something that really made a difference, particularly a long-term difference.

There was a lot of research on what LeBron could do. We held meetings with the city and other groups.  But after one meeting with Akron Public School System, [where LeBron went], we learned that high school dropout rate was 24%. This was definitely not where we wanted it to be.  To LeBron education is very important so we decided to take this problem and turn it into a program. This program had to have a long-term commitment for the children, to help them graduate, to see them through graduation, and help them through the ups and downs [of adolescence]. Between 2nd and 3rd grades, children are identified by Akron Public Schools as potentially at risk, and then they are invited to our program.  The only requirement is for the students to attend a two-week camp prior to the school year. LeBron established this as well. They must attend 8 out of the 10 camp days.  Here we teach [intervention tactics, technological skills, and more] so they feel equal or closer to their peers that may have a little more opportunity.

Once they complete camp, they are with Wheels for Education program. [Unlike a one-and-done] We closely follow the students’ progress and have a family reunion every year.  Its cool for the students to be a Wheels For Education Kid in elementary school but not for the 7th and 8th graders. As interests change at this age, we move them into the I Promise network.  Our initiatives here are designed for these older students.

The first question you asked about me, I answered very short, but when you get me talking about the program, I can talk all day.  I really love the work we are doing.

FCP: What is your most positive memory with The LeBron James Family Foundation?

MC: I also serve as COO for the business side of the house [LRMR] I do a lot of budgets, insurance, and legal work. So I see both sides.  The work I do with The Foundation is very rewarding. The letters I get, the calls I receive; they are all wonderful memories.  We invite parents and children to our advisory board meetings.  In a recent meeting we had a mother tell us that prior to our program her daughter couldn’t read and she didn’t want to go to school.  The mother was crying and said that now the daughter gets straight O’s [grade for ‘outstanding]. The help that she got from the program– and there are a million other stories. That’s the best part of my work with The LeBron Family Foundation.

FCP: What is one challenge you had to overcome in your current role?  What have you learned from that?

MC: LeBron is popular and well-known world wide, naturally people hear about the program.  I am contacted all the time by people asking to bring the program to Seattle, Detroit, Chicago, etc. The program works because of the authenticity and connection LeBron and our Foundation shares with the community of Akron.  What I tell them is if you have someone in your community who is an influencer like LeBron is in Akron; then we can help tailor fit a program around that.  But, our exact model can’t be picked up and used in any city; we work very hard to be authentic to the community. We aren’t trying to spread this foundation to 20 different locations. I always try and explain that.

Also, it is challenging for a growing program to attract sponsors. Many potential sponsors aren’t interested in Akron, Ohio. It’s a challenge when we have the high goals that we do to only lean on LeBron and fundraising to fuel everything.  We simply need more funds to activate our goals [scholarships, etc]

What I learned is that if you stay genuine and authentic to LeBron, his vision, and what we have done; then people truly connect. LeBron has made a promise to these kids.  He wears his I Promise band everyday. People ask what its for, they make their own promise, and the mFCPion is spread from there. These are sold for 1$ and these funds do help dramatically.

FCP: Following the class until graduation, the open updates from LeBron to the kids, or any of the other unique approaches LJFF has taken — How did these ideas originate?

MC: LeBron’s ultimate goal was to promote education.  This was important. Especially after identifying very low graduation rates.  He wanted to fix that.  We have three different advisory boards of experts [education, youths, other]. We rely on them to say what specific efforts will help.  LeBron created the vision and the drive.  His personality is highly evident as well.

FCP: Is there a negative development or trend with youths that you find most alarming?  Do you have a potential solution?

MC: For us, it is key to understand individual circumstances.  One of the things I’ve honed in on is the perspective of a parent. For the single parent, with two jobs and three kids, it is a challenge to be at everything at once. Parents and caregivers like this take the brunt of it.  [With our events] I always think about time of day and small things like that with the parent in mind to help alleviate the struggle.

FCP: Shifting gears a bit, what is your favorite book?

MC: Little Women. When I was young I wouldn’t really read in my free time, and if I did I wouldn’t have chose this one.  Having said that, it was the first book that I can remember thoroughly. I enjoyed reading and talking about it with my mom. The special memories attached to this always stuck out.

Right now, I am reading The Story of Greater Akron. It is really thrilling if you’re not from Akron, Ohio. It helps me learn more about the city and its intricacies.  I look forward to using this to help influence our program.

FCP: Lastly, do you have advice or tips for young people? This could be in general or in the philanthropy space

MC: Make good decisions and get help.  It’s all about working hard without giving into outside pressures. In a nutshell, that’s my best advice.

 Michele Campbell  – Chief Operating Officer, LRMR Management Company and Executive Director, LeBron James Family Foundation

Michele Campbell has spent many years pursuing her passion in the education sector. The Akron native attained her education from Ohio institutions including a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management from Ashland University, a Master’s degree from Kent State University’s Higher Education Administration, and a Doctorate from the University of Akron as a Doctor of Education. Following her own educational achievements, Campbell went to work at the University of Akron to help others pursue theirs. Beginning in 1993, Campbell served on several posts at the University including Coordinator of Greek Affairs, Associate Director of the Student Union, Interim Director of the Student Union, and finishing her service as the Assistant Dean for Student Life.

In 2006, Campbell set her educational sights on a new vision as the Chief Operating Officer of LRMR Management Company and the Executive Director of the LeBron James Family Foundation. Through the Foundation, which aims to positive affect the lives of children and young adults through education and co-curricular educational initiatives, Campbell brings LeBron’s vision to create positive and lasting change in his hometown of Akron to life through real, executable initiatives. Under Campbell’s direction, in 2011 the LeBron James Family Foundation began working on the high school dropout crisis facing the Akron community and launched its “Wheels for Education” program in partnership with the Akron Public Schools. This groundbreaking initiative targets third graders and provides them with the programs, support and mentors they need for success in school, following them all the way through graduation. Now in year three of the program, Campbell’s guidance has helped grow this thoughtful, research-based, and powerful program to more than 700 students, and will continue to expand as it takes on a new class of third graders each year. Capitalizing on the positive influence of LeBron and executing with the help of Akron community and educational leaders, the Foundation has successfully engaged and encouraged students to create positive change in their lives. With Campbell at the helm, the Foundation has taken this initiative nationwide to reach others passionate about personal and social responsibility through the I PROMISE network.

Campbell’s work with the LeBron James Family Foundation has allowed her to take her passion for education and extend it to children and families who need it most. Under LeBron’s direction, Campbell has successfully transformed the Foundation from a charity to a lifelong commitment whose impacts will be felt for generations to come.

 

Want A Piece of The Cavs? Invest In the Bench…

With all the LeBron James news and the talk of skyrocketing ticket prices, ample TV appearances, out of control franchise valuations and all else round the Cavaliers, it will be interesting to see who the smart, calm head identify as key engagement opportunities around the LeBron return. Will brands try and tie up Kyrie Irving even more? How about Anderson Varejao, there flamboyant, international star soon to be a free agent?  Do you roll with the ever-improving Tristan Thompson, or a rookie like Andrew Wiggins, with lots of upside? They all will surely get their fair share.

However a guy who could be an even better bet for brand stability is someone who won’t even put on a uniform. New head coach David Blatt.  The skeptical may say Blatt is being thrown into a pressure cooker which could quickly spit him out, with wasted time and wasted money for brands.  Very, very doubtful. Blatt, for the right brands, would be the safest investment this side of LeBron. Why? Teams now are investing more and more in the long term culture of an organization more than the quick fix. Blatt comes to the Cavs before LeBron as a global commodity; a successful basketball lifer who has a reputation for getting the respect of his players around the world, and one who gives that respect back. He is multi-lingual, multi-national and has turned very turbulent situations around in places like Russia and Israel, all the while keeping strong ties and respect with the hierarchy of NBA coaching circles. While Erik Spoelstra was somewhat of an unknown quantity outside of coaching circles when he took over the Miami Heat and gained LeBron, Blatt is a known international commodity who could become a coaching star regardless of the performance of his returning superstar now.

So what type of brands invest in a coach new to the NBA? Some will depend on his level of comfort doing things outside of his given duties. The goal is to win with the Cavs and focus there, but that doesn’t mean opportunities can’t arise. The low hanging fruit are apparel companies who can dress Blatt as he becomes a TV fixture during games. There are international brands on the business side like law firms and even law and tax firms that now spend dollars against having a key spokesperson with little public effort; it would be much more behind the scenes entertaining and talking hoops. Educational businesses could benefit from a well-traveled American who speaks several languages, and that is just the start. Yes, the choices have to be wise and incremental, with a look to the future as the team evolves.

The future should include a carefully picked coach as well as his superstar players,  and if you are a brand looking to find a spot in the hubbub, grabbing its affordable rising star on the bench, might be a safer bet than grabbing one on the floor.

Cavs Win In Social With LeBron, But Heat Haven’t Lost…

We went to the folks at MVP Index to take a look at the LeBron effect is early on in social, and to debunk the myth that Heat fans evaporated…here ya go

What impact can one man have on a brand? Ask the Cleveland Cavaliers. LeBron James’ decision to pick his first team over the Miami Heat seems to have had an invigorating effect on a sleepy sports brand in social media.

 The Cavs, with a Twitter amplification rate of 0.86, could definitely use a boost. That boost was provided in earnest when  James took his talents and his 213.27 amplification rate to Cleveland. On the day Sports Illustrated dropped the story of James’ return home, Cleveland’s mentions went from 15  per hour on July 8 to a staggering 3,118 mentions per hour on the day of Decision II. An even larger change is seen in their retweet rate. On July 8, the Cavs were seeing a retweet rate of 14.54 retweets per hour, and on the day of the decision their hourly retweet rate reached 6,202.35 per hour.

The changes weren’t just on Twitter, either. The Cavaliers’ Facebook account also experienced some dramatic changes. 23,259 more people were “talking about” the Cavaliers on July 12 than they were on July 11. That is a 96% increase in people interacting with the Cavaliers’ Facebook account in one day. They also experienced positive changes in their comment rate (307%), Like Rate (77%), and Share Rate (75%) over the same time period.

What about their reach? Before his decision on July 11, the Cavaliers’ Twitter account 336,967 followers. As of July 12, the Cav’s have 370,421, a 9.92% increase in their followers. On Facebook, the Cavs had 1,700245 likes before the decision, and on July 12 they stand at 1,773,792 likes. The Cavaliers gained 73,547 likes in just over one day due to the decision.

How do fans react when their star leaves? We can’t speak for everyone, but it’s widely assumed that the Miami Heat fans are “bandwaggoners.” An account named NBA Legion stated that the Miami Heat had lost 300,000 followers in a tweet that earned 29,585 retweets. That’s a really interesting story, and were it true, we would have seen some real data that backed up the bandwaggoner claim. It’s just not true. The Heat actually have increased their following by a marginal 1,393 people, bringing their Twitter fan base to 2,671,454.

The Cavaliers can gain more than just NBA Titles with the reacquisition of LeBron James, they now have an opportunity to resurrect their brand in social media. The immediate impact LeBron James has on a brand is impressive, but what will really be interesting to watch is Cleveland’s ability to continue growing and engaging with their fans at a steady clip. With LeBron’s added reach and influence, they can capitalize on their revitalized fan base and win sponsorships, move merchandise, and increase ticket sales.