Gordo’s Takes A Dip Into College Football, Scores A Brand TD…

It’s not like a cheese dip is always top of mind when tied to large scale and effective sponsorships, but one has found a niche through the world of college football this fall. Gordo’s Cheese Dip used not massive advertising, but old fashioned word of mouth and new age social media engagement to create a great deal of buzz and value add by attaching themselves OUTSIDE some of the biggest NCAA games this fall to find the ultimate tailgater, a natural connection to the snack product.
The search for the Gordo’s Ultimate Tailgater began on September 15, 2014 and continues through November 23, 2014. It includes some of the best college football teams including: Ole Miss vs. Boise State, Alabama vs. West Virginia, LSU vs. Auburn, Notre Dame vs. Florida State just to name a few.

The premise for this search for the ultimate fan is simple. The Gordo’s Cheese Dip video crew will be at each of these games, looking for fans who have an overabundance of school spirit. These rabble rousers will be interviewed on camera and from these interviews, three contestants will be chosen each week. The hashtag for this contest is easy to remember. It’s #GordosUTG. Fans are given a chance to vote for a weekly winner. These weekly winners will be lavished with a fabulous tailgate rig which includes two chairs a cooler, speakers and umbrella.  Over the course of the season, Gordo’s is choosing eight winners and these fans will vie for the title of Big Cheese…the Gordo’s Ultimate Tailgater. Voting will continue for two weeks to determine which fan along with a companion gets to choose his/her favorite college bowl game to attend.
The video crew has hot the biggest strategic points, wandering parking lots looking for the best parties, many with no ties at all to the product until arrival. Some have been clued in by social media prompts beforehand, but the goal is to create an unabashed best practice scenario, with a great slice of tailgating from Atlanta to Tuscaloosa, from Tallahassee to South Carolina. The cost was minimal, the exposure very high as the crew concentrated on select southern markets with a payoff coming later this winter for winners. The win for Gordo’s is in the engagement of fans in a natural environment; they use viral video (over 8 million views to date) and photo walls to engage, and spend little on traditional advertising once the game starts. They take advantage of the wide open expanses of parking lots and the beauty of southern football, not to mention the he success of the SEC on the field this fall, to build affinity, awareness, and lots of fun. The product, and the campaign are not about major market spends. It is about finding ways to engage fans with an easy to understand product that fits their lifestyle.
The result is a low cost and highly effective win, even through mid-October. A well thought out and well executed program, with a little luck of the schedule thrown in for a smart snack brand.

Warriors Tweedia Day Scores Again…

Now it’s not like teams haven’t figured out the need for use of social media or the power it now has in engaging fans. Still, harnessing that power into some centralized events is sometime a challenge. Then again you have the Golden State Warriors, who continue to refine the aggregated space and recently staged one of the best engagement platforms any team does; Tweedia Day.
Now in its fifth season, Tweedia Day follows the Warriors usual media day open house, the team when every player lines up to get done the wide variety of tasks from community relations, marketing and general media that can be housed and used throughout the year. Want to hear players doing promos in Chinese for the NBA? Media day is for you. It is very insular and usually pretty predictable, with now NBA TV dropping in for some live sessions for fans. But fan interaction? Nah, it’s all business.
For Tweedia Day, the Warriors give fans, through several platforms but especially though twitter, the ability to connect with players in real time. Factor in some live contests and some special added value areas for season subs, and Tweedia Day has become a must opt in for fans in the Bay Area and around the world. It is a nice aggregation of every member of the Warriors staff in a pretty simple but very effective format that most teams do as one-off’s but rarely as one full session. It takes time sure, but it leaves a lasting impression on all those who can join in. And of course, it is sponsorable.
Of course it’s not the only element of digital engagement that the Warriors do to build marketshare. From blogger media day to innovative video work, Silicon Valley’s team always seems to be fast and first in innovative engagement. Once again, a nice score for Golden State.

AT and T Scores With #Techgating

The amount of ways any collegiate partner, let alone an NCAA partner, can effectively engage with a young and vibrant audience grows every day. The most important element remains targeting the audience you are trying to reach so that you are not wasting time, and more importantly sponsorship dollars. Case in point is NCAA partner AT and T and their wide ranging partnership activation platform this fall.

AT&T, and NCAA Corporate Champion, have launched  #techgating. The define it as: “Where tech meets the tailgate to create a better game day.” At select college football games this season, AT&T will have an AT&T Fan Zone Tour Truck or its Amplified #Techgating Tour Truck on campus to promote #techgating. Fans can engage in a number of activities from a fight song mash-up station to a social-enabled photo booth. The key is original branded content using the students, alumni and interested fans as the focal point of the project. The more original user-generated content, the more compelling the content will be. It’s not cookie cutter and it helps each school carve its own brand identity. The program will look to capture images and content of all kinds from a wide swath of schools from Oregon to New Jersey, and will continue to post the content in real time on its own branded site, as well as micro-sites for the games they are coming in for.  There is no limit to devices used to upload, which helps AT and T expand its message of portability and accessibility with mobile technology.

Of course there’s a payoff for original content for registered users with various prizes leading to tickets and access for the 2015 College Football Championship Game.  The season-long activation is a smart way to tie local to national while keeping AT and T top of mind with consumers for their investment, all leading back to Dallas and the night when the first playoff champion is crowned.  A smart way to convey core messages while pulling together the most important part of a contest tied to digital; unique, user-generated content. Nice score for the NCAA, for the fans, and certainly for a key brand partner for college football’s biggest conferences.

Selfie Olympics? I Saw An Ad…

It is always interesting to see what attacker brands will do to try and cut through the clutter. This past week there was a half-page ad in the New York Times from the Chinese cell phone company Meitu, in English and Chinese, in the form of an “Open letter” to IOC President Thomas Bach.

The letter asked President Bach to consider making “selfies” an Olympic sport, and mentioned the company’s just-completed “Selfie World Championship” and massive engagement of people using cell phones to take pictures as evidence of the recognition of “selfie-taking” as an Olympic sport.

Interesting attention getter for a brand not yet known in the US mainstream, especially in sport, but one willing to find a way to start cutting through the clutter in a simple way to get attention, or at least start to gain some attention in the massive space.

Now there is no doubt that “selfies,” even though some have said they have jumped the shark a bit, are still an ongoing phenomenon. The selfie’s around sport that surfaced in the World Cup, during The Boston Red Sox visit to the White House (where David Ortiz caused a stir with a selfie with President Obama), with the Stanley Cup and in thousands of other places are still being taken and shared around the world. Instagram has become the sharing service of choice for consumers, and sport has taken notice and continues to work in ways to engage fans through genuine fan generated images. This weekend there will be thousands of photos, many “selfies,” generated and shared through the MLB Playoffs, college football and the NFL, all showing various levels of fun fan, and sometimes brand, engagement.

So that brings us back to Meitu and their ad, the “Olympic” tongue-un-cheek outreach, and what it could mean. It was simple; no pictures, no hashtag, no website mention for fans to engage. The facts were clear, the message was there, albeit probably tongue in cheek. Why no call to action at all? Furthermore a search, at least an English language search, for the selfie world championship yielded…one blog post mention. That’s it. A 2013, Selfie World Championship did have posts but wasn’t tied to Meitu in any way.  All of which leaves the strategy for the upstart cellphone company as a bit of a mystery, but maybe that’s the goal.

Now because there is no English language engagement doesn’t mean that Meitu’s engagement in China or other parts of Asia to this point was not effective; there are massive social media sites in China that are not yet English-language or western friendly, so it could be that this was a first step, with not a lot to offer the American sports consumer yet. Maybe the ad was meant to be provocative as a start, with more to come; see what engagement or interest comes from American brands, or even sports organizations looking to engage with an attacker brand in the space, and go from there. Still without any call to action, how would one track or engage that easily? And what if you missed the ad? Almost none of the twitter chatter about the brand is in English, which leads to even more mystery as to the strategy.

Maybe in the end this was a one-off, some kind of outlier play by an ad agency looking to spend some money; large money for a New York Times ad, and leave it at that. That would be hard to believe. What will be interesting to see if there is a follow-up, a viral advancement in English-language sports and an escalation of marketing and spending for the brand with new partners in this country. Is this some kind of play for the Olympic space? Is it a way for an attacker brand to find a way in with athletes?

It certainly is curious; whether it worked, whether it gains traction, is all up in the air. Did you see the ad? Were you curious or confused? I was…or should I have said “meitu?”

College Radio Day Worth A Listen…

Ok it’s a theme this week, but a good one…

There was a time not too long ago when many thought that audio as a medium was almost dead. We live in a video world, we need to see things, no one has time to sit by a radio… Then along came podcasting, and itunes and digital audio and Sirius/XM and I Heart Radio and blogtalk radio and suddenly the spoken voice was transformed once again. By many accounts more people listen to broadcasts today than ever before…you can be very choosy about your interests, and if you have the means, can create your own broadcasts online for you, or whomever you want, to hear.

Audio is back.

So it is with great surprise that we found that October 3 was College Radio Day around the world. College and high school stations, on air, on line from no less than 25 nations and all 50 states took part in the program, which was designed to draw attention to the value of college radio as a training ground not just for DJ’s, but for engineers, writers, bloggers, vloggers and broadcasters. Today, enterprising students, especially in politics, news and sports, can find a niche that was impossible to break into in years past. Want to host a sports radio show and get guests? be professional in your approach and just ask whomever runs the station where you are in school.  Some call letters and some informed opinions and you can build your own portfolio, and some great references. The cost of production has dropped astronomically, so the ability to record and broadcast, even live sporting events from high school games in a town to collegiate events, is more of an opportunity now than ever before. More importantly for the enterprising young man or woman, the ability to market oneself and be heard by the mainstream is easier than ever before. Educational outlets which once reached a few blocks can now be heard online around the world, and the ability to customize files and pass them along to those who may have missed a key broadcast can give anyone the ability to have an amazing career through the spoken voice.

Now is it all about the money on the college level? No. Do you have to learn about good writing skills, string notetaking and the ability to ask smart questions from professionals in the industry? Yes.  Should shock jock and smart ass opinions be your forte? Hope not. However for those looking for an entree into the media field, the world of audio is alive and kicking.

For more on College Radio Day take a look at the site and tune in.

New York’s Longest Running Sports Talkshow Hits 40…

Monday night in New York there will be a celebration of 40 consecutive years of sportstalk radio on one station; a 50,000 watt college station poised in, below and at one point atop Keating Hall on the campus of Fordham University, a place as a student, alumnus and staff member for several years I know very well. The station is WFUV, and the show being celebrated is “One on One,” which continues to be New York’s longest running sports talkshow, heard now both online and on-air. While it might not seem like much to have a show on-air today in a time when anyone can do a podcast or be a part of blogtalk radio, the fact that the show, and the hundreds if not thousands of careers that have been launched and listeners that were developed, is something to behold. More importantly there has been a level of professionalism and consistency that “One on One” has had since it launched that the students today, and all of the alumni and its longtime programming head Bob Ahrens take great pride in.

The greatest part of “One on One” over the years has not been the content, but the people; students, callers and alumni who have engaged in discussion and debate with guests big and small the old fashioned way, through the spoken voice, a form of communication that sometimes gets overlooked in the type at breakneck speed we deal with today. The show and the station have also been about accountability. Sure there have been an occasional rant but for the most part the discussions on topics big and small are intelligent, fun and worthwhile, with more than a share of guests filtered in. The show is on public radio, so there are grants but not commercial breaks, and its original times, Saturday and Sunday nights starting at 11 is a distant memory, but that doesn’t mean that the Gehrig-like weekly streak over 40 years has ever ceased, or that the memories of those who have been behind that mic are any less robust.

So yes the sports airwaves of WFUV have produced Michael Kay and Jack Curry and John Giannone and  Chris Carrino and Mike Breen and Bob Papa and Paul Dottino, who paint the scenery for sports fans on TV and radio in NY. But the school and the station have also given rise to a host of professionals young and old, who used the opportunity as a way to get started in the media capital of the world, and have passed that legacy on to those now on air. From MLB Marketing head Tim Brosnan, to over a dozen voices on Sirius/XM (like Ed Randall and Andrew Bogush), to the man who keeps the Mets on the air every night, producer Chris Majkowski, to the guy who helped build the X Games at ESPN, Rick Allesandri, to the voice of the Washington Nationals Charlie Slowes and Good Morning America’s Tony Reali, as well as others like Elias Sports Bureau head Steve Hirdt, and Malcolm Moran, currently the Director of the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University, and so many others in public relations, sports marketing, sales, production and broadcasting, WFUV Sports and “One on One,” was where it all began.

Why Fordham? It has a 50,000 watt radio station sitting in the New York area, a great journalism tradition that includes Pulitzer Prize winner Arthur Daley, Basketball Hall of Fame broadcaster John Andariese, and the legendary Vin Scully, and the ability to create entry level spots for hardworking young people through its alumni base, a group that cares and engages with others coming through the program. WFUV is also unique in that it is the ONLY voice for Fordham sports; there is no commercial entity to push the public station broadcast to the back burner. While that is probably not good from a marketing standpoint for the school, it is invaluable in the level of professionalism that the students bring to the job, and that is reflected in the careers of so many. Saying that Fordham is really dominant in the business of sports is no slight to the Newhouse School at Syracuse or the Medill School at the Northwestern. What it is is a positive point toward a small Jesuit school which has a niche and has cultivated it over time. While a sports talkshow may not seem like a big deal today, 40 years of sports talk without a break is quite a deal in a world where five minutes is sometimes too long.

Hail Men (and women) of Fordham hail for such a great job for those who work and follow sports. WFUV and “One on One,” is a great symbol of the collective success of so many for so long, and here’s to making sure it gets its due.

We Are The World; Global Sports Convergence Grows

Sunday morning thousands of soccer fans in the US will turn on Barclays Premier matches on NBC while others will watch the Ryder Cup live from Scotland. Then later it will be the Dolphins and the Raiders playing…in Wembley Stadium. Across the pond a growing number of fans will be watching NFL games as their day turns into night, and others will be engaging on NBA.com as training camp updates come flooding in. In Latin America baseball fans will be tuning in this afternoon watching Derek Jeter’s last game at Fenway Park.  Not too long ago each of these events would have been news, covered by media as a special happening, an unusual event. Now they are happenstance met with no fanfare at all. The digital world, and the growth of global sponsorship has changed live viewing habits in sport around the world, and has made sport more global than ever before, with Sunday being a great example.

There are many factors that play into why we see sports on a global scale as less unusual than ever before. The growth of soccer in the US, not just MLS but the fact that the new immigrant has taken his club loyalties and brought them here, as well as the marketing efforts of the elite clubs of the world to gain recognition amongst a grassroots following of young people that follow Chelsea or Manchester City on TV and engage on EA’s FIFA2014 as much as other generations would have put their loyalties in the Texas Rangers or Philadelphia Phillies, is a big reason for our global comfort these days. The consistent outward-bound marketing of the professional sports leagues to a more global audience, not just with merchandise but with games that are not just exhibitions (like the NFL in London) but count in the standings (MLB in Australia last spring was another big step forward) is another massive factor. Traditional broadcast media, especially the efforts of ESPN, NBC Sports and FOX to take global sporting events and find windows to broadcast and promote (not just soccer but Formula 1 and soon rugby as well) have changed viewing habits and grown the footprint of casual fans who now follow and watch at off-hours where sports was not normally seen on the east coast and Midwest. Then there is a digital engagement for sport that never existed, where fans anywhere can engage and interact with their clubs or athletes without having to be in stadium or even in country. That timeless involvement has helped bring the world together for sport 24/7, and has grown sports brands and athletes that were once regional into international powerhouses.

Then there are the brands themselves doing promotions. Years ago Emirates Airways or TATA (title sponsor of the NYC Marathon) would have been an outlier partnering with American sport. Same with American brands like Subway or even Chevrolet spending big dollars on European soccer. Now they are happenstance and growing, as non-American companies figure out how to activate with US fans, and American brands use sports and its global reach to engage more and more with fans around the world. Brands understand now more than ever how to think globally but activate locally and fit into the way local fans engage. The missteps of American brands doing a cookie cutter approach to working with fans in Tallahassee the same way as they would in Monaco are gone. It is now a stylized approach that brings ROI to all, using a combination of traditional media (since there are American fans now watching global sport, TV is still king), as well as digital and grassroots activation to make it all work.

So what does it all mean? Does it mean that suddenly somewhere we well have New York playing Moscow in some regular league in basketball or hockey or even rugby or soccer or cricket? Will The Jacksonville Jaguars work in London lead to an NFL team there? Still very hard to say if that will ever work, as time, tax laws, workman’s compensation and other factors still are big challenges. However the days of soccer friendlies in the States being a spectacle are more and more in the rear view mirror, and the same with US football in the UK or even baseball or hoops in the Far reaches of the globe. They are still special events locally, but are more happenstance on a global sports scale. That doesn’t mean they are less important, and there are still parts of the world for sport to still engage as a “first” (who gets India first from an American sport perspective; will Africa play host to baseball down the line are still areas to be explored).

However because of new media, aggressive marketing, and the ways we now engage sport is coming together nicely as a 24/7 live occurrence. We are becoming more one as a business, and that’s good news for all.

We are them, and they are us.

Diamondbacks Science Promo Is A Big Winner…

It hasn’t been the greatest of baseball years in the Valley of Sun, but that doesn’t mean the Arizona Diamondbacks haven’t continued to make an impact on the lives of young people through programs on and off the field. One that will bring classroom work together with a baseball club will take place this weekend, when the DBacks become one of the first professional sports teams to tie baseball together with the key core teaching curriculum of  STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math).

The team will host 14,000  students and their families, and give  3,000 students and teachers a chance to take part in a pregame STEM parade on the field and receive a D-backs Science of Baseball t-shirt. Combined with their naming rights partner, Chase and the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation, 10 different STEM clubs with a $2,500 grant for their work, especially in the growing field of competitive robotics, and a host of other teams from schools will be able to present their projects throughout the stadium during the night for the other fans in attendance.

While a great way to fill distressed seats and celebrate community, the DBacks work goes far beyond just one special night for kids and teachers who may rarely get recognized in an athletic setting. It is part of a growing trend to tie analytics and science to give kids an added boost and create more fun in academics, much like “Schoolhouse Rock” did with music for a previous generation. The program in Arizona was started in 2013 by Science of Baseball Founder, and University of Arizona Professor, Ricardo Valerdi, and his engineering students to keep the kids engaged by using curriculums that include classroom activities, athletic activities, and take-home activities. It has grown vastly since then, and should be replicated not just by baseball, but by every sport going forward as a way to link onfield and offfield activities. An event, and a program like this, is also highly sponsorable and can open new areas for brands who were not originally involved in sports but can use science and technology as a key area of ROI on their own businesses. For financial services firms like Chase, a tie to a sports-related STEM program further enhances their brand affiliation with sports, and also gets them connected to a younger demo which they crave but have probably not been able to hit with during a traditional signage and advertising campaign.

There is no doubt that the growing field of analytics in all areas of sport has become a hot button. On the field, teams are looking to get the extra edge through analysis like never before, while in recreation sports wearable tech and geolocation have created a new and fast growing industry. Lop on to all that the fast-expanding field of pay fantasy and e-gaming and you have a whole slew of new business opportunities tied to science and technology through sport that did not exist even a few years ago. In order to enhance and grow that field, and its future workforce who can be loyal followers and consumers of professional sport, or even college sport, teams big and small should look to the DBacks program as a way to tie in and get younger people interested and engaged through science, while at the same time taking “sports” kids and showing cool and interesting ways that science can engage with sports.

The program, and programs like it, have a very long tail for growth going forward, and should be embraced as a best practice. They tie to community, sponsorship, education, and on field performance like few others.

A big win for Arizona with this one on all fronts, and a best practice that should be copied across the board and around the world.

(Hat tip to our friends at sporttechie for pointing this out)

Mind Sports Continue To Grow…

As the fall sports now get into full swing we see analytics, gaming and pay fantasy becoming more and more a factor in the decisions of American sport. Into that mix later this fall will be another combination of all of those efforts, the latest, most robust installment of the World Mind Sports Championships, which will be held in Beijing .  The bi-annual event grows in stature and acceptance every year, and now comes with a growing list of brands looking to activate in and around the space much like they do in traditional sports.

 Are all these events some sort of rise of “nerds” into competitive events to try and steal the thunder from the die-hard sports fans and jocks for media and social attention? No. What these events signify is actually a melding of entertainment and gaming worlds to hopefully form a partnership of healthy mind, healthy body which can appeal to millions and even attract some amazing brands to a more diverse audience.

Mind Sports have been around for thousands of years, and many, especially chess, have been used by world leaders to teach strategy for ages, that is certainly no secret. Most have always operated in a vacuum and away from the casual public eye. The advent of competitive poker on television, as well as an elite champion like a Bobby Fischer, have helped to gradually raise the image of some Mind Sports over time. However in more recent times, as science comes to understand more about the stimulation of the brain to combat issues such as ADHD and Alzheimer’s Disease, the value of all mind sports has grown. Factor in the ever-growing popularity of gaming, both casual and competitive, and the case for unifying the millions who play mind sports together for a country by country competition and celebration makes great sense, and has endless possibilities. The strength will be in the numbers.

Similar to the mind sports opportunity, robotics is growing in popularity amongst young people. A culture that has grown up with gaming tied to advances in technology gives robotics on a competitive level a wide audience that can connect across any boundary via the digital world, as well as in person to person traditional competitions. The competitions teach the same skills…teamwork, strategy, attention to detail…as traditional sports do and help to also stimulate the mind.

So what does this all mean to traditional sports?

First, the simple connection is to analytics and strategy. Coaches of any level, as well as elite athletes are constantly looking for a competitive edge, and the lessons taught by mind sports or even robotics, can satisfy another dimension for both strategy that applies to athletics and for an alternative way of thinking and expanding the ability to think quickly and effectively while competing. The world of traditional sports is also becoming more and more digitized, whether that is in scouting, analyzing skills, communicating or even watching events. Robotics and mind sports can also help provide a bridge of understanding into a high tech world by applying tools and technical elements to athletes and coaches. Then there is gaming. Perhaps the fastest growing segment of competition globally is competitive and casual gaming, whether you are considered a jock or a techie. Everyone enjoys games from Angry Birds to Madden ’14, and gaming provides another key common ground between mind sports and competitive traditional athletics. There is also the jobs marketplace. More and more we are seeing professional and collegiate athletics look outside traditional circles for leadership, and those with an understanding of the tech, strategic and business world are getting more and more opportunities. The competition in mind sports could help bring another employment dimension for those versed in both convention athletics and the expanded use of competitive mind sports and gaming.

There is also the projection of the complete individual, one that marries healthy mind and healthy body. First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative has inspired thousands to get up and get active physically, and balancing that physical aspect with a healthy and active strategic mind fits very well, so a mix of competitive athletics with mind sports is a great balance.

If you are a brand what does all of this mean? Lots. Those brands of all sizes involved in traditional sport are always looking to get more bang and get access to a larger, wider demo. Activities like mind sports and robotics provide that wider audience. Tech brands are always looking to access a more mainstream audience that is becoming more savvy, and traditional sports provide that mix. Does it mean we may see Nike or Under Armour sponsoring robotics or the U.S. chess team somewhere down the line? It is actually a possibility. Does it mean that you may see more athletes paying attention to bridge or more poker players throwing a baseball, or watching rugby? That’s already happening. For 2014 brands like Rado, Renault Nissan and Samsung are already on board to activate around the games and against the thousands who will follow online or watch in person.

Mind Sports continue to grow as an intriguing alternative to the traditional engagement,  one without many of the controversies and issues of traditional sport with lots of the gamification and strategies built in for a global audience of all ages. While it will always be a niche, it is a niche that is growing, as evidenced by media partners and brands in engaging in an organized fashion, which makes the property an intriguing one to watch this fall.

Nothing Hokie About Latest Va. Tech Sponsorship…

Into the whole debate of paying college athletes or where the money goes from brands to the University came a pretty unique sponsorship pulled together by Virginia Tech as a way to use athletics to fund other programs; or at least those who teach other programs well outside of athletics.

Union First Market Bank has a coveted spot in the brand category for the Hokies, they are bank of choice for the athletic department, and with that get all the usual signage, radio sponsorship and broadcast spots that can help grow the bank’s visibility in a very crowded marketplace and they try to get a leg up with students looking to build out a financial portfolio in and around Blacksburg. The affinity with the school can be invaluable. However the institution, through the creative folks at IMG College, came up with a way to amplify the program way beyond athletics, and create good will and good opportunity all across the University, by taking some of the money to fund academic projects and research.

Junior faculty fellowships support the research and teaching of untenured assistant or associate professors who show remarkable potential. They encourage innovation in teaching and research and help the university retain its most promising junior faculty members. A percentage of the revenue produced by Union’s endowment (funds are invested for growth) will be deployed to fulfill the gift mission. Funds will be used by the Union Junior Faculty Fellow to advance research and education within the Pamplin College centered on entrepreneurship and small business development. Funds may also be used to support programming to include the business plan competition. The Junior Faculty Fellow may also participate in guest-lecture opportunities and conduct symposia. 

So while there will be lots of brand affinity for the bank by the thousands in person and on TV that will see the Union First Market logo and all that goes with the traditional spend, the spillover effect created by assisting in a non-traditional area will give an added boost, and hopefully grow a University platform not based on wins and losses.

Nice well thought-out spin for Va Tech as their partner banks on brand success that is both traditional and a little out of the ordinary.